The Antikythera shipwreck: the ship, the treasures, the mechanism

The new temporary exhibition of the National Archaeological Museum
is dedicated to the shipwreck discovered off the islet of Antikythera.
Almost all of the finds are presented in their context for the first time.
The wreck was found by sponge divers from the island of Symi and its
recovery was the first large-scale, successful, archaeological underwater
enterprise worldwide. Upon its discovery the divers from Symi, aided
by the Greek Royal Navy, raised a great number of antiquities over
1900-1901. The second attempt was undertaken by the Greek Archaeological
Service, supported by J.-Y. Cousteau and his oceanographic
ship, "Calypso", in 1976.

Three hundred and seventy eight (378) ancient works of art and coins
from the collections of the National Archaeological Museum and the
Numismatic Museum and parts of the ship itself from the Ephorate for
Underwater Archaeology, highlight the great importance and wealth of
its cargo as well as the knowledge of ancient shipbuilding and navigation.
Official correspondence and photographs from the Directorate for
the National Archive of Monuments of the Ministry for Culture and Tourism,
demonstrate the enthralling story of the discovery and recovery of
the shipwreck, the first worldwide underwater expedition.

The 82 fragments of the Antikythera Mechanism, known as the “World’s
First Computer”, will be accompanied by explicative texts and audiovisual
material prepared for the exhibition in the scope of the Programme
“Hephaestus” of the National Hellenic Research Foundation.

Event type: 
Exhibitions
Date: 
Thu, 05/04/2012 - 18:00 to Sun, 07/04/2013 - 21:00
Language(s): 
English
Greek