International Journals

Boating for Leisure, 1914 [Slide Show]

News from the Scientific American - Thu, 01/05/2014 - 16:00
Luxury liners and pleasure boats from a century ago in the Scientific American Archives

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What Shakespeare Knew about Science [Excerpt]

News from the Scientific American - Wed, 23/04/2014 - 15:00
William Shakespeare may well have been more aware of his era’s science—including the Copernican view that the planets revolve around the sun—than has generally been thought

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Why Prejudice Alone Doesn't Explain the Gender Gap in Science

News from the Scientific American - Wed, 23/04/2014 - 04:35
  This is a guest post from my friend Chris Martin. Chris (chriscmartin.com) studied psychology and music at Davidson College, human-computer interaction at Georgia Tech, and psychology at the...

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What’s the Deal with Euclid’s Fourth Postulate?

News from the Scientific American - Mon, 21/04/2014 - 15:30
In February, I wrote about Euclid’s parallel postulate, the black sheep of the big, happy family of definitions, postulates, and axioms that make up the foundations of Euclidean geometry.

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The Birth of Modern Peer Review

News from the Scientific American - Sat, 19/04/2014 - 21:19
Peer review was introduced to scholarly publication in 1731 by the Royal Society of Edinburgh, which published a collection of peer-reviewed medical articles.

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Wacky Winter Weather of 2014 Caused by 4,000-Year-Old Jet Stream

News from the Scientific American - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 19:10
Cold back East and warmth out West is a jet stream pattern that has been in place for 4,000 years, according to new research

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Vitruvian Geology – Leonardo da Vinci and the Realistic Depiction of the Earth's Surface

News from the Scientific American - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 15:17
In the Renaissance (1450-1600) architecture and pictorial arts, but also scientific disciplines like astronomy, physics and medicine, experienced a rebirth and important improvements – but what...

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It’s the end of fundamental physics. Again.

News from the Scientific American - Wed, 16/04/2014 - 17:48
Fellow Scientific American blogger John Horgan is at it again. This time he is heralding the end of fundamental physics based on the increasing time lag between Nobel Prizes awarded for fundamental...

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“Toms River: A Story of Science and Salvation” is 2014 Pulitzer Prize Winner!

News from the Scientific American - Tue, 15/04/2014 - 03:54
I am always thrilled when a science themed book wins the General Non-Fiction Pulitzer Prize. Some of my favorites from previous years include the following: 2011 Siddhartha Mukherjee “The...

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George Bush Presidential Library opens offshore drilling exhibit

News from the Scientific American - Mon, 14/04/2014 - 20:23
The George H.W. Bush Presidential Library at Texas A&M University has a new exhibit that tells the story of offshore drilling and the 41st President’s previous life as an oilman.

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The Secret Spiritual History of Calculus

News from the Scientific American - Mon, 14/04/2014 - 15:00
Integral calculus originated in a 17th-century debate that was as religious as it was scientific

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How to Solve Global Warming: It's the Energy Supply

News from the Scientific American - Sun, 13/04/2014 - 17:31
Carbon storage has to expand rapidly, or coal burning has to cease, if the world is to avoid dangerous climate change

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How Colors Revolutionized Geological Mapmaking

News from the Scientific American - Sun, 13/04/2014 - 16:22
The first maps used symbols to characterize single outcrops; later maps introduced shaded areas to display the distribution of specific rock-types, but due the high printing-costs these maps were...

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"Gospel of Jesus's Wife" Shown to Be Authentic in Tests

News from the Scientific American - Sat, 12/04/2014 - 00:00
Testing of a scrap of papyrus, which bears words suggesting that Jesus had a wife, points to the document's authenticity

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Google Doodle Honors Chemist Dr. Percy Julian

News from the Scientific American - Fri, 11/04/2014 - 20:18
April 11, 2014 would have been Dr. Julian Percy’s 115th Birthday and it was a beautiful site to behold – seeing today’s Google Doodle honoring the man and his science.

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Does Growing Time Lag for Nobels Portend End of Fundamental Discoveries in Physics?

News from the Scientific American - Fri, 11/04/2014 - 15:49
Some idiot over at National Geographic just wrote a column titled “Science Is Running Out of Things to Discover,” and the commenters are hammering him.

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Your Inner Fish Swims Onto Small Screen

News from the Scientific American - Wed, 09/04/2014 - 23:50
Paleontologist Neil Shubin's 2008 book Your Inner Fish: A Journey Into the 3.5-Billion-Year History of the Human Body comes to PBS in a three-part series airing April 9, 16th and 23rd. Steve Mirsky...

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Frustration of the day: unclear article numbers

News from the Scientific American - Wed, 09/04/2014 - 23:03
Over the past couple of days, I have been reviewing some citations for student projects.  Several of the students submitted citations in which they expressed confusion over what page numbers to...

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What is philosophy of science (and should scientists care)?

News from the Scientific American - Tue, 08/04/2014 - 02:51
Just about 20 years ago, I abandoned a career as a physical chemist to become a philosopher science. For most of those 20 years, people (especially scientists) have been asking me what the heck the...

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The Slowest Way to Draw a Lute

News from the Scientific American - Mon, 07/04/2014 - 15:30
Last month, I went to a talk by mathematician Annalisa Crannell of Franklin and Marshall College called Math and Art: the good, the bad, and the pretty.

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