International Journals

Two-Billion-Year-Old Fossils Reveal Strange and Puzzling Forms

News from the Scientific American - Thu, 29/01/2015 - 21:15
To a human, two billion years is an unfathomable interval. But that, a team of European, Gabonese, and American scientists now say, is how long ago a recently discovered hoard of fossils suggests...

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Despite Esteem for Science, Public at Odds with Scientists on Major Issues

News from the Scientific American - Thu, 29/01/2015 - 21:00
Scientists and their work have an important place in every major aspect of American life. Many hope that advances in science will improve people's lives and enhance the economy.

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Apply for Science Communication Awards, Fellowships and Internship Programs

News from the Scientific American - Thu, 29/01/2015 - 15:12
Participation of broader audiences in science, technology, engineering, mathematics (STEM) requires engaging under-served audiences. The conduit of this engagement is communication.

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Why 76 Beavers Were Forced to Skydive into the Idaho Wilderness in 1948

News from the Scientific American - Thu, 29/01/2015 - 14:54
Some time in the late 1940s, a very patient, elderly beaver called Geronimo was put in a box, flown to an altitude of between 150 and 200 metres, and tossed out the side of an aeroplane.

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As Cuba–U.S. Relations Thaw, Medical Researchers Still Struggle to Connect

News from the Scientific American - Wed, 28/01/2015 - 15:15
The economic embargo is still in place, so warming connections between the countries can only take biomedicine so far, scientists say

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Remembering NASA Challenger and #STEMDiversity

News from the Scientific American - Wed, 28/01/2015 - 14:34
The crew of STS-51-L: Front row from left, Mike Smith, Dick Scobee, Ron McNair. Back row from left, Ellison Onizuka, Christa McAuliffe, Greg Jarvis, Judith Resnik.

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Genetic Memory: How We Know Things We Never Learned

News from the Scientific American - Wed, 28/01/2015 - 14:00
I met my first savant 52 years ago and have been intrigued with that remarkable condition ever since. One of the most striking and consistent things in the many savants I have seen is that that they...

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Learn to Count like an Egyptian

News from the Scientific American - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 15:30
Last semester, I began my math history class with some Babylonian arithmetic. The mathematics we were doing was easy—multiplying and adding numbers, solving quadratic equations by completing...

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Doomsday Clock Set at 3 Minutes to Midnight

News from the Scientific American - Sat, 24/01/2015 - 23:05
Humanity's failure to reduce global nuclear arsenals as well as climate change prompted the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists to advance their warning about our proximity to a potentially...

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Did Edgar Allan Poe Foresee Modern Physics and Cosmology?

News from the Scientific American - Sat, 24/01/2015 - 17:06
I’ve always been an Edgar Allan Poe fan, so much so that I even watched the horrifying—not in a good way–2012 film The Raven.

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Book Review: Island on Fire

News from the Scientific American - Fri, 23/01/2015 - 22:00


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The Murals of Scientific American Founder Rufus Porter

News from the Scientific American - Fri, 23/01/2015 - 17:00
Perhaps the tweet below from editor-in-chief Mariette DiChristina last weekend shouldn’t have been a surprise. After all, I knew that Rufus Porter, founding editor and publisher of Scientific...

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New Life Made with Custom Safeguards

News from the Scientific American - Fri, 23/01/2015 - 16:31
A bacterium famous for food poisoning has its genetics altered to produce fuel or pharmaceuticals—and to keep it from escaping the lab

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It’s National Hug Day! Let’s Hug the Geology of Hug Point!

News from the Scientific American - Wed, 21/01/2015 - 10:14
Hug Point State Park in Oregon could use a hug. Pioneers certainly weren’t very affectionate with it: they blew bits of it up. Millions of years before that, massive amounts of flood basalt...

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NASA's Dawn Mission Captures New Image of Dwarf Planet Ceres

News from the Scientific American - Tue, 20/01/2015 - 16:05
NASA’s Dawn mission, having performed remarkably at the asteroid Vesta, is homing in on Ceres. The spacecraft’s ion engines will bring it to a capture orbit around this 590 mile diameter...

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Martin Luther King Jr.’s Haunting Reflections on Science and Progress

News from the Scientific American - Mon, 19/01/2015 - 20:50
Wanting to post something to honor Martin Luther King Day, I searched online for commentary by King on science. I found some examples in a terrific 2012 column by science journalist Cara Santa Maria,...

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Extreme Submarine, 1915

News from the Scientific American - Fri, 16/01/2015 - 17:00
Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: January 16, 1915 Before the First World War, Simon Lake designed and built some innovative submarines for the U.S.

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Ex-President Wins Campaign Against Ghastly Guinea Worm

News from the Scientific American - Thu, 15/01/2015 - 19:49
Jimmy Carter's efforts against the horribly painful guinea worm parasitic disease have helped lower the number of cases from 3.5 million in 1986 to just 126 last year. Steve Mirsky reports.  

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Science and Art Exhibits To Launch 2015

News from the Scientific American - Mon, 12/01/2015 - 21:40
The number of exhibits combining science and art in some capacity has grown steadily since I began blogging about them in 2011. With exhibits in galleries and museums across the country,...

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NASA Jet Propulsion Lab Scientist Dies in Small Plane Crash

News from the Scientific American - Sun, 11/01/2015 - 04:40
A 47-year-old scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory who worked on robotic systems for exploring Mars and extreme environments on Earth has died in a small plane crash in Los Angeles,...

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